Things We Love: bookriot’s list of 100 Women SF Authors

As the author Nikki Vanry states in the article, she is only listing one work from each author so this is a great resource for finding speculative fiction writers with whom you might not be familiar. I might quibble with the order or the representative work, but not the resource itself. Enjoy!

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On Cutting for the SF Artist

Original by Betsy James with permission.

“Top-heavy, too earnest, too detailed” describes most early drafts, certainly my own. That’s how it should be. In the beginning you have to let ‘er rip, pile it on, explore, make a mess. If you don’t you’ll get self-conscious and inhibit yourself.

Then you cut.

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Review: Never Now Always by Desirina Boskovich

Never Now Always by Desirina Boskovich (Broken Eye Books, 2017) is a young adult novella that explores memory, time, and family. Lolo is one of the “rapt children,” young people who are studied by aliens known as the Caretakers. The Caretakers keep these children in their labs because they are interested in learning more about how humans process memories. During one of her memory sessions, Lolo recalls that she has a sister, and after that moment, she rebels against the Caretakers’ normal system in a desperate search for her missing sister.

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What We Love: An essay by Dawn Xiana Moon

Kathy Kitts (Northern Illinois University) in the GSECARS research station at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, mounting a Genesis Probe sample (under the yellow plastic cover) prior to data taking. Image credit: Richard Fenner, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory

Sometimes we see something so good out in the Interwebs, we have to share it too. Here is an essay by Dawn Xiana Moon on being the other, being a geek, and art as both refuge and resistance. Check it out over on Uncanny.

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On Cutting: Sharpen the Blade

That machete was my Dad’s. In the 1930s he was a mining engineer in Argentina, working pack mules in the Andes. The machete saw a lot of use then, but when Dad died neither of my brothers claimed it. Heirlooms shouldn’t leave the family; I took it myself, feeling odd that the only daughter should inherit that gigantic phallic blade.

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